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Housebreaking a Puppy

The following guest post is written by Tony, from Smart Start Dog Training:

If you are planning on getting a puppy, you should learn how to housebreak him or her before you bring them home. You will save yourself so much added stress in your life. There are some important points to successful training and a strategic approach must be taken if you want to have a successful house training experience.

You, as the owner, will eliminate many messes from the dog urinating or defecating all over the house by confining your dog to either a crate, playpen or a smaller room for containment. You will save plenty of money due to the fact that your dog will not have the opportunity to bite and destroy furniture. I have seen some horrible destruction of the home caused by one dog.

When you cannot watch the dog, even if it is for a quick minute, put the dog in the crate or your designated space for containment. This is when the dog takes advantage and has an accident because he knows you are not watching. Also, it is peace of mind to you because you know that you are not walking out to find and have to clean an accident.

HOUSEBREAKING SCHEDULES:

During feeding time, feed your dog in the crate or the designated space for containment. This is done so that we start creating a pattern of going to the bathroom for the dog, as well as letting the dog know that when it’s feeding time, it’s feeding time and not play time. You’re making your dog concentrate without any distractions while eating.

We’re basically giving the dog a no distraction environment, so that the dog realizes that there’s nothing else to do but eat. You should always feed a puppy two times a day and give them water three times a day. Remember to keep them on the same dog training schedule, so there is consistency. You cannot keep the water down at all times because their bladder is small and any kind of excitement and stimulation will make the puppy pee. If the puppy is running and playing outside, you can give them a small amount of water, so they do not get dehydrated.

Just remember:

  • For every 10 pounds a dog should have 1 cup of water.
  • Take your puppy out approximately 30 minutes after eating and drinking.
  • Every single time the puppy wakes up they always have to pee!
  • At first, when you are home, take your puppy out every 2 hours, then progress to 3 hours after you are for sure the dog can hold it for 2 – 21/2 hours.
  • Keep a log of when your puppy is peeing and defecating to see the pattern on a daily basis. The same way you potty train a child is the same for a puppy.

The most important thing to remember is that dogs are creatures of habit and they learn from repetition and consistency. You must take the time to get your puppy on a schedule and PLEASE DO NOT GIVE UP ON YOUR DOG! It is trial and error, so give your puppy a chance and expect some accidents. PATIENCE IS KEY!

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2 Responses to Housebreaking a Puppy

  1. Jhon says:

    That’s a great blog post. The source is also great, great job guys!

  2. Heather R. says:

    Patience is definitely key, for sure. I have an Italian Greyhound and they are notoriously hard to potty train. But she is worth all the effort!

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