Pet Health Concerns: Raccoon Attack

Miniature Schnauzer

Batman, before the attack.

Recently, one of our employees here at Trupanion had a scary encounter with a raccoon. It was something she never expected to happen, and I realized I never really gave much thought to the danger of common wild animals that may reside in my neighborhood. I wanted to tell her story to remind our readers that wild animals (even the ‘cute’ ones) can be extremely dangerous.

Batman, a very sweet Miniature Schnauzer, was sniffing around his yard one morning like normal. He had just been let outside to do his ‘morning business’. But this time, he heard a rustle in the bushes along the side of his house and went to investigate. He was immediately attacked by a raccoon that, for whatever reason, was out and about in the daylight.

Batman’s owner heard a horrible scream and ran to investigate. The raccoon had Batman in its grip and wasn’t letting go. It was only after some swift hits from a broom that the raccoon let go and scampered off. Poor Batman had puncture marks on his back and scratches all along his stomach.

Raccoon Attack on Dog

Batman's back after the attack.

He was rushed to the veterinarian and seen right away. Luckily, the wounds were not too horrendous (thanks to the quick action of his owner, no doubt) and after applying some topical antibiotic and prescribing some oral antibiotics, Batman was able to go home.

The poor pup was shook up for a while and still becomes very suspicious of those bushes alongside his house, but he will be okay. Unfortunately, things could have ended up much worse.

So, I tell this story to ask pet owners to keep a close eye on their furry friends, even when exploring their own yard. Never feed or otherwise encourage wild animals to come into your yard or onto your deck. Some wild animals like squirrels, raccoons and deer can seem so cute and lovable, but the truth is that they are still wild and can cause a lot of harm.

Have you ever had an encounter with a wild animal?

About Heather @FamilyAndFur

Manager, Public and Media Relations
Heather Kalinowski lives in the Seattle area with her husband, newborn son, and two rescued pups – an Italian Greyhound named Ava and a Spaniel mix named Jackson. She enjoys reading, writing, spending time with her family, and volunteering with Italian Greyhound Rescue. Google+

One Response to Pet Health Concerns: Raccoon Attack

  1. Laura says:

    My 8-year-old Staffordshire Terrier, Bella, had a run-in with a baby racoon not long ago. It was terribly scary, especially since she got some of the racoon’s blood on her and in her mouth after shaking the poor little thing vigorously. The racoon was trying to get a snack from our compost pile, Bella ran out of the house and toward it, and it tried to get away, but Bella was faster than the baby racoon. We finally got them separated and the little thing staggered off. We washed Bella thoroughly and called an emergency vet for further guidance. They said that rabies can only be passed through saliva, not blood, so Bella was probably safe–especially since she was up-to-date on her rabies shots. We took her to her regular vet the next day, and he put her on anti-inflammatories for her injured neck (she shook the poor thing that hard!) and an antibiotic to be safe. She also got rabies and dystemper boosters. It’s been several months, and Bella’s doing just fine now.

    I just thought it might be helpful for other people to know that rabies is only passed through saliva, not blood.

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