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Bad Breath May Signal Poor Dental Health

Grin Daily Dental Treats from In Clover

The following guest post comes from Rebecca Rose, president of In Clover, Inc., which develops high quality natural supplements for pets.

According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, more than 80 percent of dogs develop gum disease by the age of three years. Common signs of poor oral health include bad breath, excessive drooling, loss of appetite due to oral discomfort, and teeth discolored by tarter build-up. Bad breath is often the most obvious sign, and products with natural breath-freshening ingredients, such as anise and chlorophyll, can improve that condition. However pet parents can help their beloved companions enjoy optimal dental health by focusing on the cause of Fido’s offensive smells, in addition to relieving the more noticeable symptoms.

Keeping your dog’s teeth clean from plaque build-up plays an important role optimal dental health. Chewing is a natural form of tooth cleaning and most dental health products available for dogs are based solely on the abrasive action of chewing something. Having dogs chew a product that holds together well enough to clean the entire tooth can help prevent dental problems. Newer, chewier formats are beginning to emerge to do this, as well as allow active ingredients to adhere to the teeth and go to work.

In addition to chewing, more complete dental products add active ingredients to go to work on what causes poor oral health in dogs. One such natural ingredient is green tea.  Research from the past decade has demonstrated that a number of substances in green tea can support tarter reduction in multiple ways. Green tea has been shown to kill the bacteria that cause dental caries, inhibit the activity of the bacteria that live below the gumline, and block the attachment of germs to the teeth. Polyphenols in green tea have anti-inflammatory properties, so they reduce gum disease, also known as gingivitis. Finally, green tea helps fight off the erosion of tooth enamel.

Keeping your dog’s breath fresher starts on the inside. Poor digestion can often be a factor leading to bad breath. A natural ingredient pet parents will find in more complete dental products is the digestive aid FOS (fructooligosaccharide). FOS is a prebiotic that feeds the naturally-occurring bacteria of the dog’s digestive tract, helping to relieve bad breath. FOS is found in some digestive aids for pets.

Pet parents have a number of tools to help their companions maintain good oral health as he or she ages. Breath freshening, chewing, tarter-control, and digestive support will all contribute to healthier teeth and gums. In addition, kisses from your pet will smell much better!

About the Author:
Rebecca Rose, president of In Clover, Inc. is a biochemist and the developer of animal health products.  She is the author of three patents on the composition and method for treating joint disorder in vertebrates. Rebecca Rose is a biochemist and head of product development for In Clover, the maker of clinically-proven animal wellness products, including GRIN Chewy Dental Treats.

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2 Responses to Bad Breath May Signal Poor Dental Health

  1. Alexs Simpson says:

    The mouth is one of the dirtiest places that harbours bacteria that if left unclean can create some of the foulest smells known to man. So, keep it clean. A clean mouth is less likely to smell. Brush twice a day, thoroughly, and floss daily. Flossing is particularly important, since food can get trapped between teeth and at the gum line. And if all else fails lookup Oraltech Labs it worked great for my bad breath problem.

  2. Karen Wylie says:

    Rebecca, your article focuses very much on dogs, but I have this same problem with my 10 month old cat: ever since he teethed at about 4 – 5 months of age, his breath has been terrible. Are there similar products out there for cats to chew? His adult teeth are absolutely huge, so much so that his canines don’t easily fit into his mouth. He also produces a lot of mucus. It would be impossible to floss or brush his teeth, as it’s hard enough just trimming his nails. Our other cats are much more amenable to being handled in these ways.

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