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Preventative Tips for Pet Owners

Veterinary visits often prove time-consuming, nerve-racking, and financially-draining for families, which are a few reasons why preventative care is so important. More to the point, it is about maintaining your pet’s health as best as possible so that it may live a life free of illness, pain, and stress. Here at Trupanion, we have compiled a handful of habits to procure for you and your pet; that way your days spent together are ones of joy and playfulness.

Bi-yearly Examinations

Though the concept of twice-a-year visits to the vet may sound like overkill, it is in fact these kinds of routine check-ups that will pick up on diseases or conditions still in their infancy. General examinations can, for instance, facilitate the diagnosis of common – but serious – pet problems such as diabetes, arthritis, heartworm disease, teeth issues, and skin irritations. Keep on top of their health by bringing them into your local vet each year.

Maintain a Healthy Weight

A healthy weight means a healthy body, and a healthy body will be much less vulnerable to serious diseases overall. Do your best to give your pet a reasonable dose of exercise each day. Personal experience will tell you whether a long walk, a vigorous run, or simply a daily play session will keep your pet fit. Diet considerations are vital too; avoid over-feeding your pet or giving it a wild variety of foods with no rhyme or reason. Overweight and obese pets often suffer from diabetes, heart and circulatory problems, joint issues, and more.

At-home Care

Fur

Some pet problems can be mitigated just by paying attention to the condition of your pet’s fur, ears, and teeth, to name a few. Granted, some breeds’ coats require a lot more brushing than others, but all could use the occasional brushing to keep their fur soft, and to check whether they have fleas or ticks. The latter two issues are significantly easier to deal with if caught and treated early before they are utterly irritating your pet’s body. Perusing their fur for fleas after being outside for a while is especially important.

Teeth

Dental disease is one of the most common maladies that affect dogs and cats today. Inflammation of the gums, gingivitis, and tooth-rot are a few frequent health issues. A regular dental examination and cleaning once a year is crucial. In the many months that pass between appointments though, try and brush your pet’s teeth once or twice a week. Oral health is a gateway to and symbol for the rest of the body’s well-being, so keeping your pet’s teeth fresh and clean is a good way to ensure the betterment of their overall health.

Ears

Cleaning your dog or cat’s ears on a weekly basis is another important component to thorough preventative care at home. As ear infections plague pets left and right, making sure their ear canals are clear and clean is critical. Although ordinary cleanings at home typically do the trick, it does not hurt to periodically bring them into the vet for a closer look (which can be done during their regular examination).

We hope these tips help you keep your pet in tip-top shape. Pet medical coverage is there to cover the unexpected, the overwhelming, and the debilitating, but taking preventative measures along the way should make your dog or cat somewhat more resilient when confronting terrible illness or disease.

2 Responses to Preventative Tips for Pet Owners

  1. Wolfman says:

    my pug sprained his left paw $585 dollars just to X ray and wrap it

  2. Hairless Cat says:

    Hi Cameron,

    Those are helpful tips and not every cat parent or dog parent has heard all of them before.

    The main tip that I don’t think many people know about is dental cleaning.

    Apparently dental cleaning is an elective class in vet school. I guess a good analogy would be that medical doctors don’t have to learn to clean teeth because that’s a dentist specialty.

    Things may be different now, but years ago I went to several vets and none of them ever recommended teeth cleaning.

    What’s your take on that issue?

    =^-^= Hairless Cat Girl =^-^=

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