A young Asian girl nuzzles noses with a tabby kittenA young Asian girl nuzzles noses with a tabby kittenA young Asian girl nuzzles noses with a tabby kitten
BARKS AND MUSINGS

A Trupanion blog

When Do Cats Stop Growing? Cat Owner Questions Answered

Kelli Rascoe | July 31, 2020

Orange and white cat curled into a ball

If you’ve recently brought home a new furry friend, you may wonder when do cats stop growing? In fact, whether you have a kitten or an adult cat, your best friend’s growth may be dependent on a number of factors. Fortunately, we sat down with Trupanion veterinarian Dr. Caroline Wilde to learn more about how cats grow and tips to keep your kitten healthy as they age.

When do cats stop growing?

Multi-colored cat with his paw stretched out

If you’re a new cat owner, you may still be learning about your best friend. This may include learning their behavior and how they grow. For example, “I would say by 2 years of age a cat’s growth is complete. Also, by nine-ten months, in most cases, a cat is probably as tall as it is going to get, and then they tend to fill out,” says Wilde. If you have any questions in regards to your cat’s growth, talk to your veterinarian. They can determine if there are any areas to look into for your pet.

Timeline from kitten to cat

Four fuzzy kittens sleeping in a cat bed together

So when does your kitten become fully grown? Every cat is different and may grow quicker than others. Wilde weighs in on how your cat develops below.

Consider the following:

Timeline graphic of when cats stop growing

Kittens grow up so quickly. They change and develop rapidly, so even if your kitten seems smaller, that’s okay. Every kitten grows at its own pace. Consider talking to your pet’s veterinarian team if you have any concerns.

For some additional insight on the “teen stage” of your kitten’s development, read The Spruce Pets kitten guide here.

Is a cat’s breed dependent on how quickly they grow or how big they are?

Your cat’s breed can play a part in their size and behavior. In fact, it may even determine how big they become.

For example, “a cat’s genetics and breed is the biggest determinant in a cat’s fully grown size. Also, feeding appropriately will then dictate maintaining an ideal weight,” states Wilde.

When you first bring home your new best friend, consider researching their breed to learn more about them. Also, talk to your veterinarian about your cat’s breed and what to expect.

Orange kitten stands near a sunlit window

Tips to keep your kitten healthy while they grow

You want your kitten to be happy and healthy. It’s fun to watch them as they grow, learn, and grow. Wilde points out some tips to keep your new best friend healthy.

  • Feed your kitten good quality kitten food.
  • Every cat’s growth and needs are unique.
  • The timing of your cat’s spaying or neutering can have an effect on growth and weight gain.
  • Your veterinarian is the best person to advise when each individual cat should transition from kitten to adult food.
  • Transitioning from kitten to cat food typically occurs from 9-10 months, but can vary.

Fuzzy grey cat relaxes in her owners lap

When do cats stop growing? It may depend on your furry friend

Whether you have a Bengal or Maine Coon, your cat grows and develops differently. But by noticing your cat’s growth, development, and talking to your veterinarian you can determine if your kitten is on track to being a fully-grown cat.

How big is your cat or kitten?

To learn more cat tips, read this Cat Care Guide.

A dog and cat snuggle

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A WORD FROM TRUPANION

Welcome to the Trupanion blog. A place to celebrate pets, pet health and medical insurance for cats and dogs.

This blog is designed to be a community where pet owners can learn and share. The views expressed in each post are the opinion of the author and not necessarily endorsed by Trupanion. Always consult your veterinarian for professional advice.